select
|

The world's best (and worst) cities to live in

For the seventh year running Melbourne has been named the world’s most “liveable” city. With Johannesburg and Pretoria being the only two South African cities to rank within the first 100. 



The capital of the Australian state of Victoria topped the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2017 ranking, which examined five categories - stability; healthcare; culture and environment; education; and infrastructure - in 140 destinations.



Melbourne was given an overall rating of 97.5 out of 100, just enough to see off the challenge of Vienna (97.4) and Vancouver (97.3). Two more Canadian cities - Toronto and Calgary - made the top five.

While the top 10 cities has remained unchanged from last year, there was some changes further down the ranking. Manchester slipped eight places to 51st, with the heightened terror threat following the bomb attack in May at an Ariana Grande concert to blame. Stockholm’s rating also fell after a terror attack in April.

The least liveable city on Earth, according to the study, is Damascus. Given the horror and hardship Syria has witnessed in recent times, few would disagree. Lagos, Nigeria; Tripoli, Libya; Dhaka, Bangladesh and Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea complete the bottom five.

Despite a year that has seen terrorist atrocities in Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, France, Pakistan, Sweden, Turkey, the UK and the US, the average rating rose this year for the first time in more than a decade.

Jon Copestake, editor of the survey, said: “Manchester has joined a number of European cities experiencing terror attacks over the last decade or so. Sadly this heightened state of alert has become the new normal for many cities but we are now in a situation where global declines have largely stabilised and even begun to register improvements.”

Amsterdam, Reykjavik, Budapest, Singapore and Montevideo are among those cities to have received a boost in the rankings.
Melbourne has topped the rankings for each of the last seven years. The most liveable city from 2002 until 2010, meanwhile, was Vancouver.

The top cities tend to be mid-sized, in wealthier countries, and with a relatively low population density, the report states. “These can foster a range of recreational activities without leading to high crime levels or overburdened infrastructure,” it adds. “ Six of the 10 top-scoring cities are in Australia and Canada, which have, respectively, population densities of 2.9 and 3.7 people per square kilometre. Elsewhere in the top 10, Finland and New Zealand both have densities ranging between 15 and 18 people/sq km of land area. These densities compare with a global average of 57 people/sq km.

“Austria bucks this trend with a density of 106 people/sq km, but compared with megacities such as New York, London, Paris and Tokyo, Vienna’s population of nearly 1.8m (2.6m in the metropolitan area) is relatively small. Global business centres tend to be victims of their own success. New York, London, Paris and Tokyo are all prestigious hubs with a wealth of recreational activities, but all suffer from higher levels of crime, congestion and public transport problems than are deemed comfortable.”

African Cities

Looking at Africa and South Africa, nine cities featured, but only the two South African cities were ranked within the top 100 – being Johannesburg (87th) and Pretoria (93rd).

• 87 – Johannesburg
• 93 – Pretoria
• 120 – Nairobi
• 124 – Lusaka
• 129 – Abidjan
• 130 – Dakar
• 132 – Douala
• 133 – Harare
• 139 – Lagos



  Comment on this Article

  Please login to post comments

Post to my facebook wall
  
2000
Characters remaining


    Latest Property News
    • 22 Feb 2018
      An excellent credit score is one of the most priceless assets a potential home buyer can have. This tool has the power to secure favorable mortgage and refinancing rate, influencing everything from the size of the loan repayment to the interest rate on the home loan.
    • 22 Feb 2018
      What do you do if you love your home’s location and the area, but the home no longer fits your growing family’s needs? Do you stay and renovate your existing home or find a home that meets your developing criteria?
    • 22 Feb 2018
      While every owner wants to sell their property at the best possible price, overpricing a home can be the kiss of death for a sale.
    • 21 Feb 2018
      Given the hand they were dealt, government has performed a delicate balancing act which it is hoped will serve to reignite confidence in investment in South Africa, regain our global credibility and satisfy the credit ratings agencies, says Dr Andrew Golding, chief executive of the Pam Golding Property group.
    • 21 Feb 2018
      The real estate mantra, ‘location, location, location’ remains a strong market influence regardless of the prevailing economy, with suburbs like Rondebosch enjoying the buffering benefit of being ideally situated.
    • 21 Feb 2018
      These days most buyers are using online property portals like Private Property when house hunting due to the convenience, up to date information and variety on offer. “The property portals have revolutionised the way buyers shop, but they do need to be cautious – viewing photos online is no replacement for viewing the property in person,” says Bruce Swain, CEO of Leapfrog Property Group.
    • 20 Feb 2018
      Owning a home is a milestone that most South Africans aspire to. Becoming a homeowner is a step towards growing personal wealth and owning an asset that appreciates in value over time, provided of course that the correct principles are applied during the buying stage of the process, says Adrian Goslett, Regional Director and CEO of RE/MAX of Southern Africa.
    • 20 Feb 2018
      The suburb of Greenstone in Johannesburg east came to be over the last two decades. “In the beginning, it was literally just a hill with not so much as a shopping centre,” says Michael Levy, Property Consultant at Jawitz Properties Bedfordview. Today it has plenty shopping facilities and is fully built, boasting high-density, upmarket housing and residential estates, though still has a few pockets poised for commercial development.
        
    X
    Subscribe to the MyProperty Newsletter

    Name  
    Last Name  
    Email Address  
    Email Frequency
    select
    X
    Share this Page

       
    For Sale Property
    Rental Property
    More Options
    About
    Connect with us
    FEEDBACK